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Stopping copyright violations on p2p: Can the technology ever work?

November 6, 2009
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Getting back to the question of if there is a technical solution that would ever be able to stop copyright violations on p2p, a couple of interesting blog posts that might back my eariler hypothesis that it is simply not possible to stop.  First off is the results from a study into anonymizing service use in Sweden.

As pressure from anti-piracy outfits on governments to implement strict anti-piracy laws increases, millions of file-sharers have decided to protect their privacy by going anonymous. In Sweden alone an estimated 500,000 Internet subscribers are hiding their identities. Many more say they will follow suit if the Government continues to toughen copyright law. These findings are the result of the Cyber Norms sociological research project carried out by a group of Swedish researchers. The researchers conducted a survey among Swedes aged between 15 and 25 and found that 10 percent of this group is currently taking measures against increasing online surveillance. Måns Svensson, PhD in Sociology of Law in Lund, estimates the percentage of all Swedes who are hidden on the Internet to be as high as 6 or 7 percent. If this figure is accurate, it means that there are more than half a million Swedes who already use a service to hide their identity.

Second is the results of a number of major ISPs dropping Usenet services (which is a bit of a web free-for-all space).  While initally there was drop in use, the ongoing upward trend is the use of the service soon resumed;

Usenet usage

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